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Friday, October 17, 2014

Android 5.0 Lollipop: 10 features you should know about Google's latest Android iteration - Tech2

Android 5.0 Lollipop: 10 features you should know about Google's latest Android iteration - Tech2



Android L is finally here – and it’s not Key Lime Pie or Licorice.
Google has named it “Lollipop”, keeping up with it’s dessert-name trend.
The new Android 5.0 Lollipop operating system has landed first on the
latest Nexus devices – Nexus 6, Nexus 9 and Nexus Player.


Android chief Sundar Pichai had earlier said this is the largest and
most ambitious release on Android to date. Here are best features
announced in the latest Android OS:


1. Pick up where you left off: Similar to Continuity in iOS 8,
Lollipop lets you pick up where you left off, so the songs, photos,
apps, and even recent searches from one of your Android devices can be
immediately accessed across devices.


2. Multiple device compatibility: Lollipop will
support devices with different screen sizes including wearables such as
smartwatches, TVs and cars. According to Google, it is designed to be
flexible, so that it can work on all your devices and customised for
your needs.


3. Material Design: In order to maintain a
consistent design experience across all Android devices, Lollipop uses
the Material Design interface across devices it runs on.With Material
Design, elements can dynamically shrink and expand, there’s more white
space between elements, and gives a 3D appearance overall. While we are
yet to try it out ourselves, Google claims that the new design is more
intuitive and transitions between tasks are more fluid.


New, improved notifications
New, improved notifications
4. Updated camera: Lollipop makes it easier to
support features like burst mode and fine settings tuning. You’ll be
able to capture full resolution frames around 30fps, and shoot in raw
formats like YUV and Bayer RAW. There’s also support for UHD 4K video
playback, tunneled video for high quality video playback on Android TV
and improved streaming. Lollipop adds professional features to control
settings for the sensor, lens and flash per individual frame.


5. Battery settings: There’s a new battery-saver
feature that extends the life of your device by up to 90 minutes—helpful
if you’re far from a power outlet. It’s also easier to manage your
power usage. The OS adds a feature which gives the estimated time left
before you need to charge and, when it’s charging, it tells you
approximately how much time it will need to charge before it’s ready to
go.


6. Improved security: Share your device securely
with guest user mode, create multiple user accounts to enable friends to
log in on your device. In either case, no one will be able to access
your private files. There’s Android Smart Lock to secure your phone or
tablet by pairing it with a trusted device like your wearable or even
your car. Google has enforced the SELinux security module for all apps
to give better protection against vulnerabilities and malware.


7. Updated notifications screen: You can now view
and respond to messages directly from your lock screen, or hide
notifications for sensitive content. Turning on Priority mode through
your device’s volume button will allow only certain people and
notifications get through.You can also choose to avoid calls from
interrupting the game you are playing or the movie you are watching.


8. New Quick Settings: The updated Quick Settings on
the notification screen has new handy controls such as flashlight,
hotspot, screen rotation and cast screen controls. While these settings
were not on older stock-Android devices, they may already be present on
other customised Android devices. Similarly, you can manually adjust
the brightness for certain conditions, while adaptive brightness will
kick in based on ambient lighting.


9. Smoother experience: Google uses a new runtime on
Android (called ART), which claims to improve app performance, battery
life and responsiveness. Google claims that the new OS improves
Android’s performance by four times. It compacts background apps and
services so you can do more at once. There’s also support for 64-bit
chips now.


10 Tap and Go: Tap and Go for NFC devices lets you
set up your new Android phone or tablet instantly by simply tapping it
to your old one. Whenever you get a new Android phone or tablet, you can
sync your apps from Google Play automatically from any of your old
Android devices.


As with all OS updates, there are minor improvements on the camera,
video and audio experience, along with better multitasking, performance
and battery life. Overall, Lollipop will provide a smoother user
experience, more usable apps and services and help you manage bloatware.
Google has also announced it will re-enable microSD card writing
support and segmentation of firmware for older devices.

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

First impressions: Jolla Sailfish OS smartphone out in India for Rs 16,499 - Tech2

First impressions: Jolla Sailfish OS smartphone out in India for Rs 16,499





Finnish smartphone company Jolla
has finally launched its Jolla Sailfish OS smartphone in India and the
device is available only on Snapdeal for a price of Rs 16,499. The phone
is available in Poppy Red, Keira Black and Aloe colours.


As far as specifications are concerned, the Jolla Sailfish OS has a
4.5-inch qHD screen with IPS panel and Gorilla Glass 2, it’s got a
Qualcomm Snapdragon 400 system-on-chip with a 1.4GHz dual-core
processor, an 8 megapixel rear camera and 2 megapixel front camera.

Thursday, September 18, 2014

iOS 8 also comes with bucket of security fixes - CNET

iOS 8 also comes with bucket of security fixes - CNET



Apple published a long list of iOS 8 security changes on Wednesday as the operating system update got delivered to users. While Apple credited many independent security experts, it continued to not differentiate bugs by severity and buried the fix to a major vulnerability.
The most notable fix of the Apple Knowledge Base list -- more than 53 vulnerabilities long -- was hidden at the bottom of the list separated from the other vulnerabilities as a "note" that read, "iOS 8contains changes to some diagnostic capabilities."
The note linked to another new Knowledge Base article, which detailed changes to the diagnostic tools in iOS 8. Previously, the tools had allowed people with unauthorized access to iOS's encryption keys to connect wirelessly to the iPhone or iPadand extract sensitive information including text messages and pictures -- without having to unlock the device.
The "backdoor" was revealed at the Hope-X conference in July by independent security and forensics expert Jonathan Zdziarski, who has devoted much of his research to iOS. The vulnerability affected around 600 million iOS devices and could be exploited by anyone, from parents to ex-lovers to government agencies, who paired a computer with the target iOS device until the iOS device was wiped.
At the time, Apple denied that the diagnostic tools were a backdoor created with "any government agency." There was also much debate among security experts as to whether the flaw even met the standard definition of "backdoor." But today, Apple updated the diagnostic tools to prevent that kind of persistent remote access. The company did not credit Zdziarski for exposing the problem, although it did credit other security researchers for finding other bugs on the list, including Zdziarski for another, unrelated bug.
Zdziarski wrote an open letter to Apple about his concerns and said that he worried that Apple buried notice of the bug fix because of the company's ongoing rocky relationship with independent security researchers.
"If it's a small bug that doesn't seem to directly affect several million people, it winds up in the security release notes," Zdziarski told CNET. "If it is a major issue, such as the trust dialog box, or gotofail, it winds up getting downplayed."
Zdziarski is referring to another flaw repaired in iOS 8 that allows users to untrust all previously trusted computers. Like the diagnostic tool fix, it was only mentioned in the Notes section of the vulnerability list.
"For these vulnerabilities to have existed in iOS 7, they could have been big risks to diplomats, executives, even Tim Cook," he said.
Apple did not respond to a request for comment.
Nevertheless, Zdziarski did cheer Apple for rapidly addressing recent security concerns, including the iCloud breach and the diagnostic tools problem.
However, these repairs aren't likely to reach people who refuse to or can't upgrade to iOS 8 since Apple rarely offers security updates for older versions of iOS. The full list of vulnerabilities covers nearly every aspect of how iOS operates, from the kernel to Bluetooth functionality to Safari's WebKit engine to how account data gets managed.
Aside from the diagnostic tool flaw, the worst of them would allow a hacker to run malicious code on your iPhone or iPad after gaining root access.
Other major flaws repaired in iOS 8 included tracking by Wi-Fi MAC address, Apple ID information available through a hole in the sandbox, user credentials open to anyone with a privileged status on the network, and a vulnerability that could allow an attacker with local access to the phone to install unverified apps without permission.
One WebKit bug was fixed last December in Safari for Mac, noted CNET sister site ZDNet, but only fixed in iOS today.
While many are heralding the era of a kinder, gentler Apple, those cultural changes have yet to extend to the security community.

Monday, September 15, 2014

Google launches Android One smartphones at Rs 6,399

Google launches Android One smartphones at Rs 6,399



Tech giant Google today launched its
much-awaited Android One smartphones, priced at Rs 6,399 onwards, in
India in partnership with domestic handset makers Micromax, Karbonn and
Spice, a move that will further fuel the fiercely competitive
multi-billion dollar market here.


 


India is the first country where the US-based firm's Android One
devices are being launched. Roll out across other markets like
Indonesia, Philippines, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal and Sri Lanka will
follow in the coming months.


 


Google is also expanding Android One programme with Acer, Alcatal OneTouch, Xolo, HTC, Lava, Intex, Asus and Lenovo.


 


It has also roped in Qualcomm for the chipsets.


 


Micromax will sell its handset Canvas A1 on Amazon, while Spice Dream
UNO will be available on Flipkart and Karbonn Sparkle V on Snapdeal.


 


These phones are available for purchase through online channels in
India from today and at retail stores across India from early October.


 


Besides, to help drive data usage Google has partnered with Airtel for free data.


 


"India is one of the fastest growing Android markets globally. In
2013-14, it saw more than 3 times growth. Internet can have a
transforming effect. The intent is to take Internet to the next billion
people," Google SVP (Android, Chrome and Apps), Sundar Pichai told
reporters here.


 


Declining to comment on future pricing of the handsets with new
partners, Pichai said the idea is to give multiple choice to consumers.


 


In June, Google announced its 'Android One' initiative to bring in
under-USD 100 handsets aimed at bringing the next one billion population
to the Android operating system ecosystem.


 


The dual-SIM devices will sport a 4.5-inch screen with a quad core
MediaTek processor, 1 GB RAM and 4 GB internal storage, which can be
expanded to 32 GB. It will feature a 5 megapixel rear camera and a 2 MP
front camera with replaceable battery and built-in radio.


 


Analysts feel Android One will lead a fiercer competition in the
mid-range smartphone market with firms offering better experience at
price points in the range of Rs 6,000-10,000.


 


Gartner Principal Research Analyst Vishal Tripathi said Android One
devices will be under Google's control thereby ensuring a standard
hardware and software specs, which in turn will lead to a better
experience for the consumers.


 


"Besides, it will also help to consolidate the highly fragmented
smartphone market in India. No doubt competition will intensify due to
this launch," he added.


 


Greyhound Research CEO Sanchit Vir Gogia feels Android One is going to be a game changer in India.


 


Google's goal is to reach the 5 billion people in emerging markets,
including a billion in India. This gives them an edge as compared
Microsoft, Apple and Blackberry, he added.


 


"Android One gives Google tighter control over the Google OS which
means standardised UX. Support for seven regional languages is going to
be a solid plus over competitors – this will not only help consumers use
vernacular, it is also likely to help promote apps in regional
language," Gogia said.


 


On the competition to Android One, Gogia said Google can expect
competition but none has the wherewithal like Google to be as aggressive
and invest heavily in the ecosystem.


 


FireFox and Tizen are competition but far from reaching critical
volumes. Firefox (in partnership with Spice and Intex) launched two new
smartphones, priced below Rs 2,300, aimed at those looking to upgrade
from feature phones to smartphones, he added.


 


"Both Microsoft and Apple are not eyeing this market at all, so we can
safely expect Google to pretty much own this market. Eventually, Android
One will touch Tablets as well," he said.


 


The launch is also important for the e-commerce partners as electronics
-- especially mobile phones -- are one of the highest selling items on
e-commerce sites.


 


Motorola and Xiaomi have successfully launched their smartphones on
Flipkart, while players like Spice and Micromax have sold devices on
Snapdeal.


 


ECommerce sites see about 4 million queries per day in India for
smartphones and in two years, one in four phones are expected to be
bought online.


 


Google also said that Newstand, which provides digital version of
newspapers and magazines, will come to India from tomorrow and has added
30 new Indian publications.


 


According to research firm IDC, smartphone sales in the country grew
almost three-fold to over 44 million in 2013, buoyed by affordable
devices made by local firms such as Micromax and Karbonn.


 


In the second quarter of 2014, 18.42 million smartphones were shipped
in India. Though Samsung is the leader with a 29 per cent market share,
Micromax (18 per cent), Karbonn (8 per cent) and LAVA (6 per cent) are
close competitors.


 


Android One should be playing in the volume sweet spot of the India
smartphone market, Mohammad Chowdhury, Leader Telecom at PwC India,
said.


 


"This market will generate 80 million plus shipments this year and so there is a lot to play for," he added.


 


Any new smartphone play in India today has to offer a better user
experience especially for video, and control features that allow users
to cap data usage in the background through apps that otherwise keep
running, Chowdhury said, adding if Android One phones can do this, there
is a better chance to succeed.


 


While Android is the dominant operating system globally, other OS' like
Windows and iOS (Apple) are also gaining traction. Also, newer
platforms like Firefox and Tizen may emerge as strong challengers to
Google's platform.


 


Google's attempts also hold importance as it aims to capture a larger share of the entry-level segment.


 


Last week, Firefox (in partnership with Spice and Intex) launched two
new smartphones, priced below Rs 2,300, aimed at those looking to
upgrade from feature phones to smartphones.
 


 




 

Thursday, September 11, 2014

dotCMS API Overview

dotCMS 2.3 API Specification



Overview (dotCMS API)

AEM 6.0 - Adobe Experience Manager (AEM)

Adobe Experience Manager (AEM) provides a complete suite of applications
for the Web Experience Management (WEM) of organisations. This
documentation includes information on installing, administering, using
and developing with AEM 6.0. It also covers AEM concepts and
architecture



AEM 6.0 - docs.day.com

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

iPhone 6 | Release date, price, specs, new features, pictures

iPhone 6 UK release date, price, specs and new features: gets 4.7in screen, faster processor and NFC

 

Apple has launched the iPhone 6 and there are two models, the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus. Here we explain everything you need to know about the new smartphone.





iPhone 6: release date

You'll be able to get your hands on the iPhone 6 on September 19th in
the UK. That's the same date as the US, so there's no waiting around
for a delayed UK release. You'll be able to get iOS 8 for any existing devices, on 17th September. See also: How iOS 8 compares with iOS 7 in screenshots


You'll be able to pre-order the iPhone 6 sooner: EE, for example,
will start taking orders from 8:01am on 12th September, as will Phones4u. If you want to buy it SIM-free, head to Apple's website.


iPhone 6: price

The iPhone 6 will be available in 16GB, 64GB and 128GB versions -
it's great to see the bigger storage capacities at last. The 16GB
version will cost £539, 64GB will be £619, and up to £699 for the 128GB
version. See: Where to buy iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus in the UK.


iPhone 6: design

The iPhone 6 will come in the same three hues as the iPhone 5s, but
this is quite a different-looking smartphone. The edges are rounded - as
shown in leaked images - and this makes the phone look thinner than it
actually is.





iPhone 6 | Release date, price, specs, new features, pictures - PC Advisor

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

15 technologies changing how developers work

 

A long time ago, developers wrote assembly code that ran fast and light. On good days, they had enough money in their budget to hire someone to toggle all those switches on the front of the machine to input their code. On bad days, they flipped the switches themselves. Life was simple: The software loaded data from memory, did some arithmetic, and sent it back. That was all.
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Today, developers must work with teams spread across multiple continents where people speak different languages with different character sets and -- this is the bad part -- use different versions of the compiler. Some of the code is new, and some may be from decade-old libraries that may or may not come with source code. Building team spirit and slogging through the mess is only the beginning of what it means to be a programmer today.
The work involved in telling computers what to do is markedly different than it was even five years ago, and it's quite possible that any Rip Van Winkle-like developer who slept through the past 10 years would be unable to function in the today's computing world. Everything seems to be changing faster than ever.
Here are 15 technologies transforming the very nature of programming. They're changing how we work with fellow developers, how we interact with our customers, and how we code. Don't get caught asleep at the console.

Developer tool No. 1: Continuous integration

When you checked in code to a repository, there used to be enough time to catch your breath, have a cup of coffee, and maybe even go out to lunch. No more -- code repositories are now tightly linked to continuous build systems that recompile your code, scrutinize your architecture, initiate hundreds of tests, and start flagging every potential error in your work. You won't get five feet from your desk before your phone starts pinging you with new emails or text messages from the continuous build mechanism telling you what needs to be fixed. Back to work, slave, the continuous build machine has new tasks for you.

Developer tool No. 2: Frameworks

Standing on the shoulders of giants by reusing the work of others may not be a new idea, but it seems like it's never been as dominant as it is today. Very little programming begins from scratch these days. The favored -- and some might argue, best -- approach is to grab the right framework, research the API, and start writing glue code to link together the parts of the API that make the most sense for the job. Web pages aren't built out of HTML or CSS anymore; the coding begins with Ext JS, ExpressJS, or some other collection of code that serves as a foundation.
Sure, you could be pioneering and build everything from scratch, but that would be suicide. There's no way to catch up with all the work done by others. You're not a craftsman -- you're a framework-tweaker. If you're thinking of writing code yourself, stop and look for a framework that does it already.

Developer tool No. 3: Libraries

A close cousin to the framework is the library, a collection of routines so ubiquitous that coders can no longer live without it. Is it possible to write code for the browser without using jQuery? Does anyone even remember there's a built-in function called GetElementByID? Nah, libraries like jQuery now rule every level of the stack.
People talk about their favorite languages, but that conversation says little about how they program. If you're looking to hire someone, you need to ask about library knowledge. Is the JavaScript programmer from the jQuery or Dojo tribe? The game programmer may use C++, but the real question is whether the coder knows Allegro, Unity, Corona, or any of a number of other options. Knowledge of the library is as important as knowing the ins and outs of the language itself.

Developer tool No. 4: APIs

In the old days, programmers worried about data structures. They would pack all their information into blocks of bytes, count the bytes one by one, then make sure the values were placed the right distance from the pointer. Now, thank goodness, the compiler does most of that for us.
These days we work through a much more rigorous interface with a fancier name: an API. This is often on a completely different machine and may be run by a completely different company that is charging us for every call. Do you want a street address and a ZIP code turned into latitude and longitude? There's an API for that, and it costs a few slivers of a penny to find each answer.
In most cases, the data doesn't need to be so tightly packed. The old game of counting bytes has been replaced by parse-able data structures such as JSON or XML. You need to make sure you have the right punctuation in the right spot, but luckily there's a library to handle that for you.

Developer tool No. 5: Platform as a service

Who builds their own website anymore? Instead, create an account on someone else's website and customize it. All it takes is a few fields in a Web form, and voilĂ , your new website does everything you wanted. It's like uploading a cat video to YouTube or bidding on a Pez dispenser on eBay.
Of course, this is a bit of an overstatement. Many of the PaaS options today require a programmer's sophistication to know what to put in each Web form. Microsoft's Azure, for instance, wants you to put in a few JavaScript functions that characterize how the website should respond. Then Azure wraps them up with the right libraries and starts them running on Node.js.

Developer tool No. 6: Browsers

There was once a time when people wrote software for desktops, software for servers, and software for devices, and it would all be different. Each had its own way of communicating with the user. Now everything goes through the browser. When I set up a local file server on my house to hold music, I go to a URL and work with a website. Widgets for Apple's desktop have been written in JavaScript and HTML for years. Many cross-platform mobile apps begin as HTML and JavaScript that's bundled with Apache Cordova.
Sure, there are holdouts. The best games are still custom work that doesn't need a browser, but that's changing, as more and more JavaScript developers figure out how to write the screen canvas object. Angry Birds, for instance, will run in a browser window.

Developer tool No. 7: Application containers

Building a server used to be hard work. The programmers would get their code running, then send a memo to the team of server curators who'd install the right software. Sometimes they got the right libraries and sometimes they didn't, but eventually we converged on something that worked.
Now application containers like Docker allow us to push a button and ship off a container with all the right libraries. If it runs on our test machine, it will almost certainly run on the server. Everything is bundled together, and most of the incompatibilities between our desktops and the server are gone.

Developer tool No. 8: Infrastructure as a service

Did I mention the teams of server curators? Those guys were fun to hang out with at lunch or after work, but now they've been abstracted away into the cloud layer, working as they do in a data center across the globe for another company that fancies itself a leader in the world of cloud this or cloud that. Few programmers need to ask the infrastructure team to build them a new server for a new project. They simply log into a website, push a button, and get a machine running for them. It's so much easier, but these IaaS administration Web pages won't buy you a drink after work. Of course, that saves you from ever having to get the next round.

Developer tool No. 9: Node.js and JavaScript

Before some of you were born, Web servers spit out static HTML. Then someone figured out how to create dynamic servers that could interact with databases. Every team needed one person to program the database in SQL, one person to write the server code in PHP or Java, and one person to design the HTML templates. Once everyone fell in love with AJAX and JavaScript running on the client, the sites needed yet another person to speak that language.
Now it's all done in JavaScript. The browser, of course, still speaks JavaScript, but so do the server layer (Node.js) and the database layer (MongoDB and CouchDB). Even the HTML is often specified with JavaScript code for a framework like Ext JS or jQueryMobile that generates the HTML at the client.

Developer tool No. 10: Secondary marketplaces

If you're building a game, you could hire your own artists to create a stunning set of models. You might even hire a few programmers to add visual effects to make the game look cool. Or you could go shopping at secondary marketplaces like the Unity Asset Store and buy up all the pieces you need. As I write this, there's a 33 percent markdown on the Tile A Dungeon Sewer Kit, "designed as a modular kit to build from small to large sewer game scenes." The sale will probably be over by you time you read this and the price will be back up to $45. Who needs developers or artists with prices so low?
There are more and more effective marketplaces for plug-ins, extensions, libraries, and other add-ons. As with libraries and frameworks, here one doesn't program so much as go shopping for the right pieces.

Developer tool No. 11: Virtual machines

The days of writing code for real chunks of silicon are largely gone. Much of the code written today runs on virtual machines that translate your instructions into something understood by the chip. The Java Virtual Machine, the C#/.Net Virtual Machine, and now JavaScript engines end up being the main target for code.
The popularity of the VM is growing to absorb everything in the stack. In the past, if you wanted to create a new language, you would need to build the entire stack from pre-processor to register allocator. These days, new languages sit on top of the old virtual machines. Clojure, Scala, Jython, JRuby -- they're all piggybacking off Sun's (now part of Oracle) great work in building the VM.
This same behavior is appearing in the browser world. Sure, you could create your own browser and language, or you could cross-compile it to be emulated in JavaScript. That's what the folks did when they built cleaned-up tools like CoffeeScript. If this isn't confusing enough, Google produced GWT (Google Web Toolkit) to convert Java to JavaScript.

Developer tool No. 12: Social media portals

In the early days of the Internet, you would build your own website, cross your fingers, and hope people would find it. When they did, they simply had to remember your cool URL.
Alas, more and more of the Web is being absorbed into big silos like Facebook and Salesforce. If you build your own website, you might turn it on and hear the sound of crickets because all of humanity is clicking away in Facebook or Salesforce.
The solution, of course, is to build a Facebook or Salesforce app. They'll let you in and let you integrate with their platform to a point. But in the end, your app is an extra that could be limited or tossed aside with a wave of a hand. What choice do you have? You're either a lackey to the big portals or you're listening to crickets.

Developer tool No. 13: Devops tools

Once upon a time, we installed software on a server -- singular. Now we rent servers en masse, requiring dozens, hundreds, or even thousands of machines, many of which need to be provisioned on demand, full of fresh software -- a job that can no longer be done effectively by hand.
Enter the "devops" trend and underlying tools such as Chef and Puppet designed to maintain these servers for you. Push new software to the cloud and these tools handle the job of keeping all the computers running the same code. They automate what we used to do by hand for one machine.

Some services such as Google App Engine already handle this internally. All you need to do is give it your app, and the provisioning is automatic. You don't even know what's going on in the background; you merely get a bill for the amount of CPU cycles consumed.

Developer tool No. 14: GitHub, SourceForge, and social code sharing

Code-sharing sites may be the greatest contribution to the open source world. Before services like SourceForge came along, software was something you built on your own and shared on your own. If someone wanted a copy of the code, they came to you and you sent them a tar-ball if you felt like it.
Now code sharing is a social network. Sites like SourceForge and GitHub post all the code for everyone to see and update. They merge the process of maintaining, sharing, and commenting on the code in one easy-to-access place. You can read the code and suggest changes, all through one interface. Is it any wonder that many projects see tens or even hundreds of thousands of downloads each week? That would never be possible with the old model.
This model is now so dominant that most proprietary projects follow it. Sites like GitHub and BitBucket support themselves by selling nonpublic repositories that offer all the power of sharing, but within a limited permission group.

Developer tool No. 15: Performance monitoring

In the beginning, tracking the power of your code was simple. You printed out the time when the code began, then printed out the time when it ended. If you wanted to be fancy, you added a few extra calculations to do the subtraction for you.
That can't cut it any longer. Many of the problems don't occur on one machine. Adding a profiler to your code won't reveal the real bottleneck, which could be caused by some weird interconnection or a sluggish database. Modern tools track the network calls for the network of software as well as the performance of individual modules. This is the only way to understand what is going right and going wrong.
This is just one important way of how the model of programming is morphing from a single machine to a network of connected tools that may or may not play well together.

 

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Best Way To Hack WiFi Password Easily

Hack WiFi Password With Backtrack "Linux window"

In this post you will learn about how to hack WiFi password. Now you are going to be a little hacker for start this smart hacking trick in softrainy. Today we are introducing you top one method for hack any WiFi puzzle password. Best thing of this way is no matter password is in capital with numerical or highly secure security cover or secure codeword. Before Start hacking you need to download two software VMware and Backtrack. Through this software you will able to hack WiFi code.
                         
As we know that many time we have to need wifi connection for example we are in other city and want to use internet in mobile or laptop free so without wifi connection we can't use internet. When we try to connect wifi signals that time ask password for access to connect, so that time we give password but show error that we give wrong password because of we don't know that what the correct password. We should know that if we don't know password we can't use wifi connection free but through this method it will hack any wifi password very easily

How I Was Hack My Friend WiFi Password

Friends now i am going to tell you my first experience. One day i am at friend home that time i am getting bore because of my friend is so busy in some other work that time i think that i should use internet in my mobile so i ask WiFi password to my friend, he didn't tell me password just take my mobile and give password to my phone. After these scene i challenge to my friend that i will hack your password in a month that time he smile and said to me ok if you hack my password then i will give you treat then after one day i realize that it is a big challenge for me. I try so many methods to hack WiFi password but i didn't get success. After 28 days my cousin come at my home he is a (software engineer) he saw me upset then ask me what happened with you then i told him all story. My Cousin said to me don't take a tension i have best method to hack WiFi password then he told me this method. After using these method i realize that this method is top one method to hack. Next day i went to my friend home then i hacked his password as a hacker.

Now you should use these way to hack any WiFi password just follow some steps then you will get success.

Method To Hack WiFi Password

Following Steps are:

1)  Install VMware then Run VMware Then open Backtrack ISO.

2) After start Backtrack, Open Shell Console.

3) Write airmon-ng then hit enter. This will show you interface, chipset, driver and etc.

4) Write airodump-ng wlan0 then hit enter. Wait for some times when it's going to search for available connections.

5) You can see a list of hotspot then select a hotspot name which you want to hack.

6) Then just copy the ch value of your chosen connection. Then write airdump-ng-c then past ch value just after this. Then next to the ch value type –bssid space your bssid number then -w wep_hack wlan0 and just press enter.

(Example: airdump-ng-c ch value –bssid 00:1F:9F:73:C0:45 -w wep_hack wlan0)

7) Wait for few seconds and do not close the window.

8) After finished window then open a new shell console then write dir then hit enter.

9) Write aircrack-ng -a 1 –b and your bssid.

(Example: aircrack-ng -a 1 -b 00:1F:9F:73:C0:45 wep_hack-01.cpp)

10) Then its show you these text decrypted correctly 100%, it means that you have successfully done this process.

11) Enjoy.

WarningDon't try it for illegal , this method just for knowledge. 

Friday, July 11, 2014

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JDK 8

Features

JEPS are grouped according to the area and component taxonomy used in the JEP Process. On this page a JEP number links directly to the cited JEP document, while a JEP title links to the corresponding short summary below.

--/-- 126 Lambda Expressions & Virtual Extension Methods
138 Autoconf-Based Build System
160 Lambda-Form Representation for Method Handles
161 Compact Profiles
162 Prepare for Modularization
164 Leverage CPU Instructions for AES Cryptography
174 Nashorn JavaScript Engine
176 Mechanical Checking of Caller-Sensitive Methods
179 Document JDK API Support and Stability
vm/-- 142 Reduce Cache Contention on Specified Fields
vm/gc 122 Remove the Permanent Generation
173 Retire Some Rarely-Used GC Combinations
vm/rt 136 Enhanced Verification Errors
147 Reduce Class Metadata Footprint
148 Small VM
171 Fence Intrinsics
core/-- 153 Launch JavaFX Applications
core/lang 101 Generalized Target-Type Inference
104 Annotations on Java Types
105 DocTree API
106 Add Javadoc to javax.tools
117 Remove the Annotation-Processing Tool (apt)
118 Access to Parameter Names at Runtime
120 Repeating Annotations
139 Enhance javac to Improve Build Speed
172 DocLint
core/libs 103 Parallel Array Sorting
107 Bulk Data Operations for Collections
109 Enhance Core Libraries with Lambda
112 Charset Implementation Improvements
119 javax.lang.model Implementation Backed by Core Reflection
135 Base64 Encoding & Decoding
149 Reduce Core-Library Memory Usage
150 Date & Time API
155 Concurrency Updates
170 JDBC 4.2
177 Optimize java.text.DecimalFormat.format
178 Statically-Linked JNI Libraries
180 Handle Frequent HashMap Collisions with Balanced Trees
core/i18n 127 Improve Locale Data Packaging and Adopt Unicode CLDR Data
128 BCP 47 Locale Matching
133 Unicode 6.2
core/net 184 HTTP URL Permissions
core/sec 113 MS-SFU Kerberos 5 Extensions
114 TLS Server Name Indication (SNI) Extension
115 AEAD CipherSuites
121 Stronger Algorithms for Password-Based Encryption
123 Configurable Secure Random-Number Generation
124 Enhance the Certificate Revocation-Checking API
129 NSA Suite B Cryptographic Algorithms
130 SHA-224 Message Digests
131 PKCS#11 Crypto Provider for 64-bit Windows
140 Limited doPrivileged
166 Overhaul JKS-JCEKS-PKCS12 Keystores
web/jaxp 185 Restrict Fetching of External XML Resources

A summary of the changes to this list over time is available at the bottom of this page.

--/--
126 Lambda Expressions & Virtual Extension Methods
Add lambda expressions (closures) and supporting features, including method references, enhanced type inference, and virtual extension methods, to the Java programming language and platform.
Owner: Brian Goetz
Author: Joseph D. Darcy
Discussion: lambda dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M7
138 Autoconf-Based Build System
Introduce autoconf (./configure-style) build setup, refactor the Makefiles to remove recursion, and leverage JEP 139: Enhance javac to Improve Build Speed.
Author: Magnus Ihse Bursie
Discussion: jdk8 dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M6
160 Lambda-Form Representation for Method Handles
Improve the implementation of method handles by replacing assembly language paths with an optimizable intermediate representation and then refactoring the implementation so that more work is done in portable Java code than is hardwired into the JVM.
Author: John Rose
Discussion: mlvm dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M6
161 Compact Profiles
Define a few subset Profiles of the Java SE Platform Specification so that applications that do not require the entire Platform can be deployed and run on small devices.
Owner: Bob Vandette
Author: Bob Vandette, Mark Reinhold
Discussion: jdk8 dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M7
162 Prepare for Modularization
Undertake changes to smooth the eventual transition to modules in a future release, provide new tools to help developers prepare for the modular platform, and deprecate certain APIs that are a significant impediment to modularization.
Author: Alan Bateman
Discussion: jigsaw dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M7
164 Leverage CPU Instructions for AES Cryptography
Improve the out-of-box AES Crypto performance by using x86 AES instructions when available, and by avoiding unnecessary re-expansion of the AES key.
Author: Vladimir Kozlov
Discussion: hotspot dash compiler dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M6
174 Nashorn JavaScript Engine
Design and implement a new lightweight, high-performance implementation of JavaScript, and integrate it into the JDK. The new engine will be made available to Java applications via the existing javax.script API, and also more generally via a new command-line tool.
Author: Jim Laskey
Discussion: nashorn dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M7
176 Mechanical Checking of Caller-Sensitive Methods
Improve the security of the JDK’s method-handle implementation by replacing the existing hand-maintained list of caller-sensitive methods with a mechanism that accurately identifies such methods and allows their callers to be discovered reliably.
Owner: John Rose
Author: John Rose, Christian Thalinger, Mandy Chung
Discussion: core dash libs dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M7
179 Document JDK API Support and Stability
There is a long-standing shortcoming in the JDK in terms of clearly specifying the support and stability usage contract for com.sun.* types and other types shipped with the JDK that are outside of the Java SE specification. These contracts and potential evolution policies should be clearly captured both in the source code of the types and in the resulting class files. This information can be modeled with JDK-specific annotation types.
Author: Joseph D. Darcy
Discussion: core dash libs dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M7
vm/--
142 Reduce Cache Contention on Specified Fields
Define a way to specify that one or more fields in an object are likely to be highly contended across processor cores so that the VM can arrange for them not to share cache lines with other fields, or other objects, that are likely to be independently accessed.
Owner: Tony Printezis
Author: Jesper Wilhelmsson, Tony Printezis
Discussion: hotspot dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M6
vm/gc
122 Remove the Permanent Generation
Remove the permanent generation from the Hotspot JVM and thus the need to tune the size of the permanent generation.
Author: Jon Masamitsu
Discussion: hotspot dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M5
173 Retire Some Rarely-Used GC Combinations
Remove three rarely-used combinations of garbage collectors in order to reduce ongoing development, maintenance, and testing costs.
Author: Bengt Rutisson
Discussion: hotspot dash gc dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M6
vm/rt
136 Enhanced Verification Errors
Provide additional contextual information about bytecode-verification errors to ease diagnosis of bytecode or stackmap deficiencies in the field.
Author: Keith McGuigan
Discussion: hotspot dash runtime dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M5
147 Reduce Class Metadata Footprint
Reduce HotSpot’s class metadata memory footprint in order to improve performance on small devices.
Author: Jiangli Zhou
Discussion: hotspot dash runtime dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M6
148 Small VM
Support the creation of a small VM that is no larger than 3MB.
Author: Joe Provino
Discussion: hotspot dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M6
171 Fence Intrinsics
Add three memory-ordering intrinsics to the sun.misc.Unsafe class.
Author: Doug Lea
Discussion: hotspot dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M7
core/--
153 Launch JavaFX Applications
Enhance the java command-line launcher to launch JavaFX applications.
Author: Kumar Srinivasan
Discussion: core dash libs dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M5
core/lang
101 Generalized Target-Type Inference
Smoothly expand the scope of method type-inference to support (i) inference in method context and (ii) inference in chained calls.
Author: Maurizio Cimadamore
Discussion: lambda dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M7
104 Annotations on Java Types
Extend the set of annotatable locations in the syntax of the Java programming language to include names which indicate the use of a type as well as (per Java SE 5.0) the declaration of a type.
Author: Michael Ernst, Alex Buckley
Discussion: type dash annotations dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M7
105 DocTree API
Extend the Compiler Tree API to provide structured access to the content of javadoc comments.
Author: Jonathan Gibbons
Discussion: compiler dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M5
106 Add Javadoc to javax.tools
Extend the javax.tools API to provide access to javadoc.
Author: Jonathan Gibbons
Discussion: compiler dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M5
117 Remove the Annotation-Processing Tool (apt)
Remove the apt tool, associated API, and documentation from the JDK.
Author: Joseph D. Darcy
Discussion: compiler dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M1
118 Access to Parameter Names at Runtime
Provide a mechanism to easily and reliably retrieve the parameter names of methods and constructors at runtime via core reflection.
Owner: Alex Buckley
Author: Joseph D. Darcy
Discussion: enhanced dash metadata dash spec dash discuss at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M7
120 Repeating Annotations
Change the Java programming language to allow multiple application of annotations with the same type to a single program element.
Owner: Alex Buckley
Author: Joseph D. Darcy
Discussion: enhanced dash metadata dash spec dash discuss at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M7
139 Enhance javac to Improve Build Speed
Reduce the time required to build the JDK and enable incremental builds by modifying the Java compiler to run on all available cores in a single persistent process, track package and class dependences between builds, automatically generate header files for native methods, and clean up class and header files that are no longer needed.
Author: Magnus Ihse Bursie
Discussion: compiler dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M6
172 DocLint
Provide a means to detect errors in Javadoc comments early in the development cycle and in a way that is easily linked back to the source code.
Author: Jonathan Gibbons
Discussion: javadoc dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M6
core/libs
103 Parallel Array Sorting
Add additional utility methods to java.util.Arrays that use the JSR 166 Fork/Join parallelism common pool to provide sorting of arrays in parallel.
Owner: Chris Hegarty
Author: David Holmes, Chris Hegarty
Discussion: core dash libs dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M6
107 Bulk Data Operations for Collections
Add functionality to the Java Collections Framework for bulk operations upon data. This is commonly referenced as “filter/map/reduce for Java.” The bulk data operations include both serial (on the calling thread) and parallel (using many threads) versions of the operations. Operations upon data are generally expressed as lambda functions.
Author: Mike Duigou
Discussion: lambda dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M7
109 Enhance Core Libraries with Lambda
Enhance the Java core library APIs using the new lambda language feature to improve the usability and convenience of the library.
Owner: Stuart W. Marks
Author: Stuart W. Marks, Mike Duigou
Discussion: core dash libs dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M7
112 Charset Implementation Improvements
Improve the maintainability and performance of the standard and extended charset implementations.
Author: Xueming Shen
Discussion: core dash libs dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M4
119 javax.lang.model Implementation Backed by Core Reflection
Provide an implementation of the javax.lang.model.* API backed by core reflection rather than by javac. In other words, provide an alternate API to access and process the reflective information about loaded classes provided by core reflection.
Author: Joseph D. Darcy
Discussion: compiler dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M7
135 Base64 Encoding & Decoding
Define a standard API for Base64 encoding and decoding.
Author: Alan Bateman
Discussion: core dash libs dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M6
149 Reduce Core-Library Memory Usage
Reduce the dynamic memory used by core-library classes without adversely impacting performance.
Owner: Roger Riggs
Author: Roger Riggs, Hinkmond Wong, David Holmes
Discussion: core dash libs dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M6
150 Date & Time API
Define a new date, time, and calendar API for the Java SE platform.
Owner: Xueming Shen
Author: Stephen Colebourne
Discussion: core dash libs dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M6
155 Concurrency Updates
Scalable updatable variables, cache-oriented enhancements to the ConcurrentHashMap API, ForkJoinPool improvements, and additional Lock and Future classes.
Owner: Chris Hegarty
Author: Doug Lea
Discussion: core dash libs dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M7
170 JDBC 4.2
Minor enhancements to JDBC to improve usability and portability
Author: Lance Andersen
Discussion: jdbc dash spec dash discuss at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M6
177 Optimize java.text.DecimalFormat.format
Optimize java.text.DecimalFormat.format by taking advantage of numerical properties of integer and floating-point arithmetic to accelerate cases with two or three digits after the decimal point.
Author: Joseph D. Darcy
Discussion: core dash libs dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M5
178 Statically-Linked JNI Libraries
Enhance the JNI specification to support statically linked native libraries.
Author: Bob Vandette
Discussion: jdk8 dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M7
180 Handle Frequent HashMap Collisions with Balanced Trees
Improve the performance of java.util.HashMap under high hash-collision conditions by using balanced trees rather than linked lists to store map entries. Implement the same improvement in the LinkedHashMap class.
Owner: Brent Christian
Author: Mike Duigou
Discussion: core dash libs dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M7
core/i18n
127 Improve Locale Data Packaging and Adopt Unicode CLDR Data
Create a tool to convert LDML (Locale Data Markup Language) files into a format usable directly by the runtime library, define a way to package the results into modules, and then use these to incorporate the de-facto standard locale data published by the Unicode Consortium’s CLDR project into the JDK.
Author: Naoto Sato
Discussion: i18n dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M5
128 BCP 47 Locale Matching
Define APIs so that applications that use BCP 47 language tags (see RFC 5646) can match them to a user’s language preferences in a way that conforms to RFC 4647.
Owner: Yuka Kamiya
Author: Naoto Sato
Discussion: i18n dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M5
133 Unicode 6.2
Extend existing platform APIs to support version 6.2 of the Unicode Standard.
Author: Yuka Kamiya
Discussion: i18n dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M5
core/net
184 HTTP URL Permissions
Define a new type of network permission which grants access in terms of URLs rather than low-level IP addresses.
Author: Michael McMahon
Discussion: net dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M7
core/sec
113 MS-SFU Kerberos 5 Extensions
Add the MS-SFU extensions to the JDK’s Kerberos 5 implementation.
Author: Weijun Wang
Discussion: security dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M5
114 TLS Server Name Indication (SNI) Extension
Add support for the TLS Server Name Indication (SNI) Extension to allow more flexible secure virtual hosting and virtual-machine infrastructure based on SSL/TLS protocols.
Author: Xuelei Fan
Discussion: security dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M5
115 AEAD CipherSuites
Support the AEAD/GCM cipher suites defined by SP-800-380D, RFC 5116, RFC 5246, RFC 5288, RFC 5289 and RFC 5430.
Owner: Bradford Wetmore
Author: Xuelei Fan
Discussion: security dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M7
121 Stronger Algorithms for Password-Based Encryption
Provide stronger Password-Based-Encryption (PBE) algorithm implementations in the SunJCE provider.
Owner: Vincent Ryan
Author: Valerie Peng
Discussion: security dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M5
123 Configurable Secure Random-Number Generation
Enhance the API for secure random-number generation so that it can be configured to operate within specified quality and responsiveness constraints.
Author: Bradford Wetmore
Discussion: security dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M7
124 Enhance the Certificate Revocation-Checking API
Improve the certificate revocation-checking API to support best-effort checking, end-entity certificate checking, and mechanism-specific options and parameters.
Author: Sean Mullan
Discussion: security dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M3
129 NSA Suite B Cryptographic Algorithms
Provide implementations of the cryptographic algorithms required by NSA Suite B.
Author: Valerie Peng
Discussion: security dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M4
130 SHA-224 Message Digests
Implement the SHA-224 message-digest algorithm and related algorithms.
Author: Valerie Peng
Discussion: security dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M3
131 PKCS#11 Crypto Provider for 64-bit Windows
Include the SunPKCS11 provider in the JDK for 64-bit Windows.
Author: Valerie Peng
Discussion: security dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M3
140 Limited doPrivileged
Enable code to assert a subset of its privileges without otherwise preventing the full access-control stack walk to check for other permissions.
Author: Sean Mullan
Discussion: security dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M7
166 Overhaul JKS-JCEKS-PKCS12 Keystores
Facilitate migrating data from JKS and JCEKS keystores by adding equivalent support to the PKCS#12 keystore. Enhance the KeyStore API to support new features such as entry metadata and logical views spanning several keystores. Enable the strong crypto algorithms introduced in JEP-121 to be used to protect keystore entries.
Author: Vincent Ryan
Discussion: security dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M6
web/jaxp
185 Restrict Fetching of External XML Resources
Enhance the JAXP APIs to add the ability to restrict the set of network protocols that may be used to fetch external resources.
Author: Joe Wang
Discussion: core dash libs dash dev at openjdk dot java dot net
Milestone target: M7

Change history

2012/9/11

  • 103 Parallel Array Sorting — Targeted to M5
  • 127 Improve Locale Data Packaging — Targeted to M5
  • 150 JSR 310: Date and Time API — Targeted to M6

2012/11/6

  • 121 Stronger Algorithms for Password-Based Encryption — Retargeted to M5
  • 129 NSA Suite B Cryptographic Algorithms — Retargeted to M5
  • 133 Unicode 6.2 — Retargeted to M5

2012/12/4

  • 103 Parallel Array Sorting — Retargeted to M6
  • 110 New HTTP Client — Retargeted to M6
  • 111 Additional Unicode Constructs for Regular Expressions — Dropped
  • 112 Charset Implementation Improvements — Retargeted to M4
  • 119 javax.lang.model Implementation Backed by Core Reflection — Retargeted to M6
  • 136 Enhanced Verification Errors — Targeted to M5
  • 140 Limited doPrivileged — Retargeted to M6

2012/12/6

  • 138 Autoconf-Based Build System — Targeted to M6
  • 142 Reduce Cache Contention on Specified Fields — Targeted to M6
  • 143 Improve Contended Locking — Targeted to M6
  • 147 Reduce Class Metadata Footprint — Targeted to M6
  • 148 Small VM — Targeted to M6
  • 149 Reduce Core-Library Memory Usage — Targeted to M6
  • 155 Concurrency Updates (jsr166e) — Targeted to M6
  • 161 Compact Profiles — Targeted to M6
  • 162 Prepare for Modularization — Targeted to M6
  • 165 Compiler Control — Targeted to M6
  • 166 Overhaul JKS-JCEKS-PKCS12 Keystores — Targeted to M6
  • 170 JDBC 4.2 — Targeted to M6
  • 171 Fence Intrinsics — Targeted to M6
  • 172 DocLint — Targeted to M6

2012/12/20

  • 139 Enhance javac to Improve Build Speed — Targeted to M6

2013/1/14

  • 108 Collections Enhancements from Third-Party Libraries — Dropped
  • 110 New HTTP Client — Dropped
  • 156 G1 GC: Reduce need for full GCs — Dropped
  • 107 Bulk Data Operations for Collections — Retargeted to M7
  • 123 Configurable Secure Random-Number Generation — Retargeted to M7
  • 155 Concurrency Updates — Retargeted to M7
  • 171 Fence Intrinsics — Retargeted to M7
  • 164 Leverage CPU Instructions for AES Cryptography — Targeted to M6
  • 173 Retire Some Rarely-Used GC Combinations — Targeted to M6

2013/1/30

  • 101 Generalized Target-Type Inference — Retargeted to M7
  • 109 Enhance Core Libraries with Lambda — Retargeted to M7
  • 118 Access to Parameter Names at Runtime — Retargeted to M7
  • 119 javax.lang.model Implementation Backed by Core Reflection — Retargeted to M7
  • 120 Repeating Annotations — Retargeted to M7
  • 126 Lambda Expressions & Virtual Extension Methods — Retargeted to M7
  • 140 Limited doPrivileged — Retargeted to M7
  • 161 Compact Profiles — Retargeted to M7
  • 174 Nashorn JavaScript Engine — Targeted to M7

2013/2/20

  • 104 Annotations on Java Types — Retargeted to M7
  • 115 AEAD CipherSuites — Retargeted to M7
  • 162 Prepare for Modularization — Retargeted to M7

2013/4/30

  • 143 Improve Contended Locking — Dropped
  • 165 Compiler Control — Dropped
  • 176 Mechanical Checking of Caller-Sensitive Methods — Targeted to M7
  • 177 Optimize java.text.DecimalFormat.format — Targeted to M5
  • 178 Statically-Linked JNI Libraries — Targeted to M7
  • 179 Document JDK API Support and Stability — Targeted to M7
  • 180 Handle Frequent HashMap Collisions with Balanced Trees — Targeted to M7
  • 184 HTTP URL Permissions — Targeted to M7

2013/6/13

  • 185 JAXP 1.5: Restrict Fetching of External Resources — Targeted to M7
Last update: 2014/3/18 16:40 -0700
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